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Transfinite Research
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About Transfinite Research

 
 
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The story of Transfinite Research

Transfinite Research was founded in 1997 by Dr Tim Price, a teacher and former Oxford research scientist, in response to the lack of high-quality maths educational software. Dr Price began writing programs for his own classes; soon his students were keen to have copies to use at home, and then word spread to other schools in the area.

In Autumn 1997, Maths Connections was launched, a program that generates random questions on-screen and gives students immediate feedback on their answers, permanently recording their strengths and weaknesses. It has been received with great enthusiasm by teachers and students alike, as well as attracting critical acclaim in the educational press.

MATHSprint builds on the success of Maths Connections to produce an unlimited supply of intelligently-randomised questions, with a vast, unparalleled topic coverage of Levels 4, 5 and 6 of the NZ Maths and Statistics Curriculum, plus many topics in Levels 7 and 8 (including Networks). Its PDF worksheets can be printed, displayed on a whiteboard or even emailed to students who have missed lessons. It is an indispensable time-saving tool for anyone involved in Mathematics education, and to our knowledge, there is nothing else as powerful and flexible on the market.

MATHSprint is used by several hundred schools and thousands of students across the world (Moscow, Beijing, Paris, Dubai, London, Hanoi, Hong Kong) and increasing numbers of NZ schools are already discovering its benefits.

Why 'Transfinite'?

Georg Cantor developed the theory of Transfinite Numbers in the nineteenth century and proved that the real numbers cannot be put into one-one correspondence with the natural numbers, thereby demonstrating the existence of more than one type of 'infinity'. This fascinated me in my mid-teens and the name was a natural choice when devising software generating an 'unlimited' variety of questions.

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